The New Postgres Era

Having attended several conferences recently, I saw confirmation of my previous
observation that Postgres is poised for a new wave of adoption. The last
time I saw such an upturn in adoption was with the release of Postgres 8.0 in 2005, which
included a native port of Postgres to Windows. You can see the increase in the
volume of postings to the
Postgres jobs email list. (The spike in January of 2008 was Sun
buying MySQL.)

And that's not all — Robert Haas's recent blog
post
about Postgres scaling linearly to 64-cores in upcoming Postgres 9.2 means that, by the end of the year, Postgres will be a major
contender on high-end hardware. We have always done well on small to medium-sized servers, but we are now poised to compete heavily on
the high-end.

Continue Reading »

The New Postgres Era
By  , Apr 09, 2012

Having attended several conferences recently, I saw confirmation of my previous
observation that Postgres is poised for a new wave of adoption. The last
time I saw such an upturn in adoption was with the release of Postgres 8.0 in 2005, which
included a native port of Postgres to Windows. You can see the increase in the
volume of postings to the
Postgres jobs email list. (The spike in January of 2008 was Sun
buying MySQL.)

And that's not all — Robert Haas's recent blog
post
about Postgres scaling linearly to 64-cores in upcoming Postgres 9.2 means that, by the end of the year, Postgres will be a major
contender on high-end hardware. We have always done well on small to medium-sized servers, but we are now poised to compete heavily on
the high-end.

Continue Reading »

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