The EDB Blog

May 28, 2019


We are thrilled to announce that Tim Berners-Lee will deliver the keynote presentation at our fourth annual Postgres Vision conference in Boston.

Named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Important People of the 20th Century,” one of the UK’s “100 Greatest Britons,” and one of the world’s “Most Influential Thinkers,” Sir Tim Berners-Lee created the most powerful communication medium in the world — the World Wide Web — and gave it to the world for free.

When Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web, he saw a future no one else could have imagined and changed our lives forever. Now he is looking ahead to our next, new un-imagined future. What does that look like? What will it mean for your business and our society?

Register now to save your seat for his talk, “A Look Ahead Into the Future of Tech”.  

Sir Tim takes his audiences beyond the technology itself, for example – The Internet of Things, Future of Artificial Intelligence, The Next Web Paradigm Shift, The Power of Data, Impact of Security and Privacy on the Web and business and into the real transformative impact these technologies are having and will have in the years ahead.

Register Now

 

More About Sir Tim Berners-Lee

  • Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989 while working as a software engineer at CERN, the large particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland.
  • Sir Tim documented what was to become the World Wide Web with the submission of a proposal specifying a set of three fundamental technologies that remain the foundation of today’s Web: HTML, URL, and HTTP.
  • He also wrote the first Web page editor/browser (“WorldWideWeb”) and the first Web server (“?httpd“). By the end of 1990, the first Web page was served.
  • By 1991, people outside of CERN joined the new Web community, and in April 1993, CERN announced that the World Wide Web technology would be available for anyone to use on a royalty-free basis.
  • In 2007, Sir Tim recognized that the Web’s potential to empower people to bring about positive change remained unrealized by billions around the world. Announcing the formation of the World Wide Web Foundation, he once again confirmed his commitment to ensuring an open, free Web accessible and meaningful to all where people can share knowledge, access services, conduct commerce, participate in good governance and communicate in creative ways.
  • A graduate of Oxford University, Sir Tim teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a 3Com Founders Professor of Engineering and in a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at CSAIL. He is a professor in the Electronics and Computer Science Department at the University of Southampton, UK, Director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), and author of Weaving the Web and many other publications.